Saturday, July 21, 2018

Henry Cobb and Patience Hurst

Henry Cobb and his first wife, Patience Hurst, daughter of James Hurst, arrived in Plymouth in 1632. Perhaps it's better to say that both Henry and Patience were in Plymouth and married by that date. It's not clear from the documentation whether they married in Massachusetts colony or before arrival. Patience's father was also an early immigrant to the region (but I haven't reached the H book, yet, so I don't know how early).

Henry was born around 1607, based on his year of marriage. His background is unknown. He and Patricia had seven known children. We're the descendants of their eldest son, John.

Henry was a tavernkeeper. Although the family started in Plymouth, they had moved to Scituate by 1634 and to Barnstable by 1639. Most of our Kinney ancestry comes from the Barnstable area, which is out on the arm of Cape Cod. Interestingly, when the Cobbs left Scituate, they sold their lot and house to Manasseh Kempton, another of our ancestors, the husband of Juliann Carpenter.

Both Henry and Patience were members of the church. Henry was ordained a ruling elder in Barnstable in April 1670. He was a freeman before 1633. Henry had at least some education. He was able to sign his own name, as seen on some surviving documentation. His estate included 24s of books. Henry served a number of offices, including deputy and excise collector for Barnstable, and on a number of juries. While a Barnstable deputy, he was fined for "defect in appearance". He was also one of the men authorized to bear arms in 1643.

After Patricia's death, Henry married Sarah Hinckley in December 1649. They had seven children. Henry died sometime between February of 1678 and June of 1679. Patience was buried in Barnstable in May 1648. At his death, Elder Cobb's estate was valued at 80 pounds, including his house and land.

Henry Cobb -- Patience Hurst
  - John Cobb -- Martha Nelson
     - Ebenezer Cobb -- Mercy Holmes
        - Hannah Cobb -- Jacob Tinkham
           - Jacob Tinkham -- Lydia Dunham
              - Hannah Tinkham -- Lemuel Bartlett
                 - Lydia Bartlett -- Thomas Kinney
                    - Simeon Kinney -- Olive Doane
                       - Thomas Kinney -- Mary Elizabeth Houghton
                          - Julia Kinney -- Ernest Hancock



References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Mary Chilton

Here's another...interesting organizational choice in Anderson's The Great Migration Begins. Our ancestor, Mary Chilton, is not given her own entry. Neither is her mother, whose name may or may not have been Susanne. Instead, both are listed under Mary's father, James Chilton. OK, again, maybe there's some justification in Anderson always listing the head of the household, who will usually be a man. But here's the thing: James Chilton never made it to Plymouth. The Chilton family were passengers on the Mayflower. James died before the Mayflower reached the colony, in December of 1620, while it was still anchored off the coast of Cape Cod. He may have never set foot on the land. His wife died soon after, in January of 1621. Only Mary survived.

But of course she doesn't have her own entry.

James Chilton was a tailor. He was born around 1556, probably at Canterbury, Kent, the son of Lionel Chilton. He married by 1586, but his wife's name is not known for certain. Together they had ten known children. Mary was the youngest, burn in 1607. The family moved to Leiden, part of the Puritan community there, where at least one of their older daughters married. Anderson cites a notarial record from Leiden describing an assault on James and his daughter in April 1619. Some historians believe this assault was one of the events that encouraged the Puritans to find a new, safer, home for their religious beliefs.

The Chiltons took only their youngest child with them on the Mayflower. Mary was about 13 at the time. Her eldest sister, Isabella, migrated in 1632 with her husband, Roger Chandler. There is no further record of the other children. James and his wife died in the first major infection that swept through the Mayflower passengers. He did sign the Mayflower Compact before his death. Tradition claims that their daughter, Mary, was the first Mayflower passenger to step onto Plymouth Rock. She married John Winslow by May of 1627.

Notably, this is one of the few cases where our descent from the early Puritans is not through the Kinney line, but rather through my paternal grandmother's Manary line.

Mary Chilton -- John Winslow
  - Susanna Winslow -- Robert Latham
     - James Latham -- Deliverance Alger
        - Anne Latham -- Nicholas Wade
           - John Wade -- Sarah Arbuckle
              - Hannah Wade -- James McGregor
                 - John McGregor -- Susan Baker
                    - Ellen McGregor -- William Manary
                       - Joseph Manary -- Rebecca Wilson




References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Juliann Carpenter and Manasseh Kempton

Here's a real treat: one of the only women to be given her own entry in Anderson's The Great Migration Begins. Sort of.

There's a whole other blog post to be written about the way Anderson organizes his volume by the male head of household, with women as the afterthought, tucked away in the "married" section. Even when women came to the Massachusetts Colony as single, independent people, they don't all get their own entry. Take Juliann. She and her three other sisters are hidden away under their youngest sister Priscilla's entry. It's not clear why the other sisters don't get their own independent entries, since all but one was in Plymouth before 1633. The last of the five sisters may also have been there, I just don't have the documentation to know at this point. They're probably discussed in more detail under their husbands' entries.

Anyway, here's the story of five sisters: Juliann, Agnes, Alice, Mary, and Priscilla, all daughters of Alexander Carpenter, who probably arrived as single women at Plymouth, or perhaps married men who then came to Plymouth, or both. 

Alexander Carpenter was from Wrington, Somersetshire. His five daughters were born between 1583 and 1598, although all dates are conjectural. He moved his family to Leiden by 1611, along with many of the other Puritans. Alexander never came to Massachusetts, but his daughters did. William Bradford wrote a letter to Mary Carpenter of Wrington, who was his wife Alice's sister, in August of 1644 or 1646 noting that the Carpenter sisters' mother had recently died and invited Mary to join them in Plymouth. Although Anderson doesn't lay it out in detail, I assume this means a) the Carpenter sisters were close kin to Alice Carpenter Bradford; b) the Carpenter sisters' mother, who is unnamed at least in Anderson's book, had also come to Massachusetts. Anderson notes that all of the sisters seem to have married a little later than was the norm for women of the time. This seems consistent (to me, at least) with their independence in coming to the colony on their own.

Juliann, our ancestor, was probably the eldest sister. She married George Morton. After she was widowed, she married Manasseh Kempton before May 1627. We are descended from their daughter, Patience Kempton. The second sister, Agnes, married Samuel Fuller. Alice married Edward Southworth and after his death William Bradford (yes, the one whose wife was her kin). Mary never married but lived until 1687 (Go girl!). Priscilla married William Wright and then John Cooper.

Is this a good time to point out how ridiculously inbred the Puritans were? By 1633, the English population of the Massachusetts Colony was still pretty small. Plus, they'd followed a type of chain migration, bringing their brothers and sisters, cousins, and in-laws to the colony once they'd settled in, narrowing their matrimonial choices even further. It's no surprise that we are descended from so many people who are listed in Anderson's book. If you have any ancestry from the early Great Migration period, you most likely are related to a significant percentage of the very small, very endogamous community that perched on the edge of Wampanoag territory.

Juliann Carpenter -- Manasseh Kempton
             - Patience Morton -- 
                 - Thomas Faunce -- 
                     - Martha Faunce -- 
                         - Mary Doty -- 
                             - Lemuel Bartlett -- 
                                  - Lydia Bartlett -- Thomas Kinney
                                      - Simeon Bartlett Kinney -- Olive Doane Kinney 
                                          - Thomas Kinney -- Mary Houghton Kinney
                                              - Julia Kinney Hancock -- Ernest Hancock




References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Peter and Martha Brown (or Browne)

Here's another in my series of ancestors who are documented in Robert Charles Anderson's The Great Migration Begins.  Peter Brown is one of our Mayflower ancestors. He was born around 1600, based on his date of marriage. His wife, Martha, arrived on the Fortune in 1621. Her first husband, William Ford, died on the voyage. Martha arrived with their two children and gave birth to another child almost immediately upon landing. By 1626, she married Peter. She died in 1630 or 1631, after bearing him two daughters, Mary and Priscilla. Peter quickly remarried, to a woman named Mary (last name unknown), but he did not live much longer. He died sometime before October 10, 1633, when his estate was inventoried.

Peter was listed as a freeman by 1633. It's not clear if he was educated. The only book in his estate was a bible. His estate was worth over 100 pounds, but was complicated by the fact that his household included his own children from two different wives and his his wives each had children from a previous marriage. Our ancestor, Peter's daughter Mary, was placed upon her father's death in the household of John Doane, of Plymouth. She would have been around seven years old. John Doane is also one of our ancestors, as Mary's descendants eventually intermarried with his.

Peter had a brother, John, who also came to Massachusetts by 1632 and lived in Duxbury.


Peter Browne -- Martha (unknown) Ford
             - Mary Browne -- Ephraim Trinkham
                 - Helkiah Tinkham -- Ruth Cooke
                     - Jacob Tinkham -- Hannah Cobb
                         - Jacob Tinkham -- Lydia Dunham
                             - Hannah Tinkham -- Lemuel Bartlett
                                  - Lydia Bartlett -- Thomas Kinney
                                      - Simeon Kinney -- Olive Doane  
                                          - Thomas Kinney -- Mary Houghton
                                              - Julia Kinney Hancock -- Ernest Hancock



References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Saturday, June 23, 2018

William and Mary Brewster

 A page from the "Brewster Book," containing some of the family birth and death records for William and Mary Brewster and their children.
A page from the Brewster family Bible. http://mayflowerhistory.com/brewster-william/


William and Mary Brewster were founding members of the separatist congregation at the heart of the Mayflower voyage. They were in Scrooby until 1608, when they fled with other members of the congregation to Leiden, where William became an elder, teacher, and printer. They were a leading family among those who undertook that first voyage to Plymouth.

William was born around 1566, probably in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire. His father's name was also William Brewster. Mary's maiden name is unknown. They were married by 1593.

William was well educated. He entered Peterhouse, Cambridge, in 1580, although he did not graduate. At the time of his death, an inventory of his estate found nearly 400 books, in English and in Latin, worth 42 pounds.

The Massachusetts colony did not have a formal minister, so William took on many of those duties, including preaching. He continued to do so after the family moved to Duxbury, after Mary's death on April 17, 1627. William died in Duxbury, April 10, 1644. They had six children, one of whom died in infancy. The surviving children were: Jonathan (born in 1593, clearly named before his parents converted), Patience, Fear, Love, and Wrestling. We are descended from his daughter Patience.

William Brewster -- Mary (unknown)
  - Patience Brewster -- Thomas Prence
                 - Mercy Prence -- John Freeman
                     - Edmund Freeman -- Sara Mayo
                         - Ruth Freeman -- Israel Doane
                             - Edmund Doane -- Elizabeth Osborn

                              - Israel Doane -- Desire Nickerson
                                    - Israel Doane -- Mehitable Kinney 
                                        - Olive Doane Kinney -- Simeon Kinney
                                            - Thomas Kinney -- Mary Houghton Kinney
                                                - Julia Kinney Hancock -- Ernest Hancock





References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Saturday, June 16, 2018

William and Elizabeth Bassett

File:Reverend James Keith Parsonage, West Bridgewater MA.jpg
The Reverend James Keith Parsonage, built in Bridgewater, MA in 1662. It would have been a substantial part of the town where William (and possibly Elizabeth) Bassett lived. Photograph by John Phelan, wikicommons.


I'm continuing my series of ancestors who are documented in Robert Charles Anderson's The Great Migration Begins

There was more than one William Bassett in the Massachusetts colony during the Great Migration. This particular William Bassett was probably born around 1600, based on his marriage age. He and his first wife, Elizabeth, came to the colony in 1621 on the Fortune. While they originally lived in Plymouth, they moved to Duxbury by 1637 and Bridgewater by 1656. William was a blacksmith and a freeman before 1632/3. He must have been educator for his estate included more than twenty books, mostly about theology. 

William served in a number of committees and offices, including on juries and as a constable for Duxbury. He was listed as one of the men allowed to bear arms in 1643. He had an estate of at least 100 acres, and the final inventory of his estate valued more than 123 pounds without the land. More than 9 pounds of that was books, and a substantial amount more were his blacksmiths tools. 

Like, apparently, all inhabitants of the Massachusetts colony, William had occasional run-ins with the law. In his case, he was fined in 1648 for "not mending of guns in seasonable time" and in 1653 for "neglecting to publish and make known an order directed to him from the council of war, prohibiting provisions for being transported out of the colony."

It is unclear when Elizabeth died. She is not mentioned in any documentation after 1627, but William did not remarry until after 1651. Sometime between 1651 and December 12, 1664, he married Mary Tilden Lapham, daughter of Nathaniel Tilden and widow of Thomas Lapham. They did not have children.

William gave an oral will on April 3, 1667, and presumably died soon after.

We are descendants of William and Elizabeth's second son, Nathaniel, born around 1630. He married Dorcas Joyce, the daughter of John Joyce. 

            - William Bassett -- Elizabeth (unknown)
                 - Nathaniel Bassett -- Dorcas Joyce
                     - Hannah Bassett -- Joseph Covell
                         - Sarah Covell -- William Nickerson
                             - Mercy Nickerson -- Heman Kenney
                                  - Isaac Kenney -- Sarah Godfrey
                                      - Mehitable Kenney -- Israel Doane
                                          - Olive Doane -- Simeon Bartlett Kinney
                                             - Thomas Kinney -- Mary Houghton Kinney
                                                 - Julia Kinney Hancock -- Ernest Hancock


References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Saturday, June 9, 2018

Robert Bartlett and Mary Warren Bartlett

Continuing my series on ancestors who can be found in Anderson's The Great Migration Begins (1995).

Robert Bartlett arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts Colony, in 1623 on the Anne. He was a wine cooper, a freeman by 1632/3, and probably illiterate, since he signed all deeds with a mark. His origins are unknown, but it is estimated he was born in 1604, based on his date of marriage.

Highlights of his career in Plymouth include being summoned before the court on May 1, 1660, and convicted of "speaking contemptuously of singing of psalms". He also served on various committees, particularly those related to laying out or surveying highways and land. He was on the list of men in Plymouth who were permitted to bear arms in 1643. 

Before 1629, he married Mary Warren, the daughter of his neighbors Richard and Elizabeth Warren. Robert, Mrs. Elizabeth Warren (the mother-in-law) and his brother-in-law Thomas Little appear frequently in documentation pertaining to land and crops in and around Plymouth. He seems to have owned quite a bit of land. He received one acre upon arrival (as did all of Anne's passengers), but subsequent documents mention at least 100 acres of land.

Robert and Mary had eight known children: Benjamin, Rebecca, Mary, Sarah, Joseph, Elizabeth, Lydia, and Mercy. We are descendants of the second son, Joseph, who was born around 1639 and married Hannah Pope, daughter of Thomas Pope.

Robert gave a spoken will on September 19, 1676. In October, the inventory of his estate totaled 170 pounds, 16s, 6d, including 100 pounds in real estate, 2 houses and a barn.

Robert Bartlett -- Mary Warren
     - Joseph Bartlett -- Hannah Pope
          -Robert Bartlett -- Sarah Cooke
               - Lemuel Bartlett -- Mary Doty
                    - Lemuel Bartlett -- Hannah Tinkham
                         - Lydia Bartlett -- Thomas Kinney
                              - Simeon Bartlett Kinney -- Olive Doane
                                   - Thomas Kinney -- Mary Elizabeth Houghton
                                        - Julia Kinney -- Ernest Hancock


References:

Anderson, Robert Charles 1995 The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. New England Historic Genealogical Society.